What is Price-to-Earnings (P/E) Ratio?

What is Price-to-Earnings (P/E) Ratio?

PE Ratio Meaning

The price-to-earnings (P/E) ratio is a financial metric used to assess the valuation of a company's stock. It is calculated by dividing the current market price per share of the company's stock by its earnings per share (EPS). Essentially, it reflects how much investors will pay per dollar of earnings.

A higher P/E ratio typically indicates that investors expect higher future growth and are willing to pay more for each unit of current earnings. In comparison, a lower P/E ratio may suggest that the stock is undervalued or that growth expectations are modest. The P/E ratio is widely used for comparing companies within the same industry or sector, though it should be used alongside other metrics and factors to make informed investment decisions.
 

Start Your Stock Market
Journey Now!

50 Years Trust |₹0 AMC |₹0 Brokerage *

Table of Content

  1. PE Ratio Meaning
  2. An overview on the P/E Ratio
  3. P/E Ratio Formula and Calculation
  4. Few types of Price to Earnings (P/E) Ratio
  5. Examples of the P/E Ratio
  6. Let us compare companies using P/E Ratio
  7. Investor Expectations in P/E ratio
  8. P/E vs. Earnings Yield
  9. P/E vs. PEG Ratio
  10. Absolute vs. Relative P/E 
  11. Why consider the Price-to-Earnings (P/E) Ratio before investing in stocks?
  12. Unveiling the 7 limitations of using P/E Ratio
  13. A glance at alternatives to P/E Ratio 

An overview on the P/E Ratio

The P/E ratio is very popular among investors and analysts when they look at how much a stock is worth compared to others. It helps figure out if a stock is priced too high or too low. You can also compare a company's P/E with other companies in the same industry or with the whole market, like the S&P 500 Index.

Analysts who want to understand how stocks are valued over a long time can use P/E 10 or P/E 30. These measures average a company's earnings over the past 10 or 30 years. They help judge the overall worth of stock indexes like the S&P 500 because they show how values change over many years, including different economic periods. 

P/E Ratio Formula and Calculation

The formula and calculation is given below: 

                             Market value per share
      P/E Ratio =    ___________________

                             Earnings per share

The Price to Earnings Ratio (P/E Ratio) formula is a popular measure used by analysts and investors worldwide. It shows how much investors are willing to pay for each rupee of a company's earnings. For example, if a company has a P/E Ratio of 20, investors are willing to pay Rs. 20 for every Re. 1 of its current earnings. 

When a company has a high P/E Ratio, it can mean two things: the company might be overvalued, or it could be poised for growth. Another way to understand a high P/E ratio is that investors and analysts expect the company to earn more money in the future. This speculation often drives up the company's current stock prices. 

On the other hand, a low P/E ratio indicates that stocks may be undervalued, possibly due to risks in the market—whether systematic or specific to the company. Another way to see a low P/E ratio in the stock market is that investors anticipate poor future performance from the company, causing its current stock prices to decrease.

Few types of Price to Earnings (P/E) Ratio

There are two main types of P/E ratios that investors consider: forward P/E ratio and trailing P/E ratio. These ratios depend on the timing of earnings, which are explained below as follows:

Trailing Price-to-Earnings

Trailing Price-to-Earnings (P/E) ratio is a financial metric that reflects the ratio of a company's current stock price to its earnings per share (EPS) over the past 12 months. It provides investors with a snapshot of how much they are paying for each rupee of a company's earnings based on historical data rather than future projections. Trailing P/E is widely used to evaluate the valuation of a company's stock relative to its earnings performance over the most recent year.

Forward Price-to-Earnings

The forward P/E ratio is calculated by dividing the price of one share of a company's stock by its estimated future earnings. Because it is based on expected future earnings, it is also known as an estimated P/E ratio. Investors use the forward P/E ratio to predict how well a company might do in the future and how fast it might grow. 

However, there are issues with the forward P/E metric. For example, companies might intentionally underestimate their future earnings to make their estimated P/E ratio look better when the actual earnings for the next quarter are reported. Additionally, external analysts may provide estimates that differ from those of the company, which can confuse them.

Valuation from P/E Ratio

Valuation from the Price-to-Earnings (P/E) ratio provides investors with insight into how expensive or cheap a stock is relative to its earnings. A low P/E ratio suggests that a company's stock is relatively inexpensive compared to its earnings, potentially indicating it is undervalued or experiencing temporary setbacks. Conversely, a high P/E ratio may suggest that investors are expecting strong future growth, but it could also mean the stock is overvalued. The P/E ratio is one of several factors investors consider when assessing the attractiveness of a stock for investment.

Examples of the P/E Ratio

Envisage a company's stock is currently trading at Rs. 50 per share, and its earnings per share (EPS) over the past year were Rs. 5. To find its P/E ratio, you divide the stock price (Rs.50) by its EPS (Rs. 5). In this case, the P/E ratio would be 10. This means investors are willing to pay Rs. 10 for every rupee of the company's earnings. P/E ratios can vary widely between companies and industries, helping investors gauge how much they are paying for potential earnings growth.

Let us compare companies using P/E Ratio

Example: Tech Company vs. Utility Company

Tech Company: Let us say Company A, a tech giant, has a P/E ratio of 30. This means investors are willing to pay Rs. 30 for every Rs. 1 of Company A's earnings.

Utility Company: Company B, a utility provider, has a P/E ratio of 15. Here, investors are paying Rs. 15 for every Rs. 1 of Company B's earnings.

Interpreting the Comparison:

High P/E (Company A): A higher P/E ratio like Company A's 30 suggests investors expect high growth or future earnings potential. Tech companies often have higher P/E ratios because they are expected to grow quickly.

Low P/E (Company B): A lower P/E ratio like Company B's 15 indicates investors are paying less for each rupee of earnings. Utility companies typically have lower P/E ratios because they are considered stable with slower growth.

What does the comparison mean?

Comparing these companies, investors might conclude that Company A (tech) is perceived as riskier but with higher growth potential, while Company B (utility) is seen as less risky but with lower growth expectations.

Key Considerations:

P/E ratios can vary widely between industries and individual companies. They are just one factor to consider alongside other financial metrics when evaluating investment opportunities. Using the P/E ratio helps investors gauge how much they are paying relative to a company's earnings, providing insight into market expectations and risk perceptions.

Investor Expectations in P/E ratio

The P/E ratio reflects investor expectations about a company's future earnings growth. A high P/E ratio typically suggests that investors believe the company will grow its earnings rapidly in the future, while a low P/E ratio may indicate that the company is currently undervalued or that its earnings growth prospects are modest. When a company has no earnings or is posting losses, its P/E ratio is not applicable (N/A) because there are no earnings to divide by the stock price.

P/E vs. Earnings Yield

The inverse of the P/E ratio is called the earnings yield. It is like a measure of how much a company earns compared to its stock price. You find it by dividing the company's earnings per share (EPS) by its stock price, and then you express that number as a percentage. 
The earnings yield is not used as much as the P/E ratio. Earnings yield is helpful if you care about how much money you are making from your investment. But for investors who earn regular income from their investments, this might not be their main worry. That is why many investors like to use measures like the P/E ratio or stocks to decide what to invest in.

P/E vs. PEG Ratio

The Price-to-Earnings (P/E) ratio compares a company's current stock price to its earnings per share (EPS) which indicates how much investors are willing to pay for each rupee of a company's earnings. A higher P/E ratio can suggest that investors expect higher future growth, but it can also indicate that the stock may be overvalued. On the other hand, a lower P/E ratio might mean the stock is undervalued or that growth expectations are modest. 

In contrast, the Price/Earnings to Growth (PEG) ratio adds a layer by incorporating the company's expected earnings growth rate. By dividing the P/E ratio by the expected earnings growth rate, typically over five years, the PEG ratio provides a more holistic view of the stock's valuation relative to its growth potential. 

A PEG ratio less than 1 suggests that the stock may be undervalued relative to its growth prospects, while a PEG ratio greater than 1 could indicate overvaluation. This makes the PEG ratio particularly useful for investors looking to assess stocks with different growth rates and to identify potential opportunities based on both current earnings and future growth expectations.

Absolute vs. Relative P/E 

The absolute and relative Price-to-Earnings (P/E) ratios offer distinct perspectives on a company's valuation. The absolute P/E ratio calculates the stock's valuation based on its current price relative to its (EPS), providing a straightforward measure of how much investors are willing to pay for each dollar of earnings. 

In contrast, the relative P/E ratio compares a stock's P/E ratio to either its sector, industry, or historical average, offering insight into whether the stock is overvalued or undervalued relative to its peers or its past performance. 

Why consider the Price-to-Earnings (P/E) Ratio before investing in stocks?

·         The P/E Ratio provides a key metric for assessing a stock's valuation relative to its earnings. A lower P/E ratio typically suggests that a stock may be undervalued or priced more attractively compared to its earnings potential, making it potentially a good buy.

·         On the other hand, a higher P/E ratio might indicate that the stock is either overvalued or that investors expect significant growth in the company's future earnings.

  Understanding the P/E ratio helps investors gauge whether a stock is priced reasonably based on its current earnings and market expectations, aiding in making informed investment decisions aligned with its risk tolerance and growth objectives.

Unveiling the 7 limitations of using P/E Ratio

The price-to-earnings (P/E) ratio is a widely used financial metric, but it comes with several limitations that investors should consider:

  • The P/E ratio is calculated using earnings per share (EPS). However, EPS can be manipulated by accounting practices or one-time events, leading to an inaccurate reflection of a company's true profitability.
  • Different industries have varying average P/E ratios due to factors such as growth rates, risk profiles, and capital intensity. Comparing P/E ratios across industries may not provide meaningful insights. 
  • High-growth companies may have inflated P/E ratios because investors expect future earnings growth. However, if growth expectations are not met, the P/E ratio may adjust sharply, potentially leading to overvaluation. 
  • P/E ratios can fluctuate significantly during economic downturns, wherein earnings may decrease, causing P/E ratios to rise even if stock prices fall, making valuation comparisons challenging. 
  • P/E ratios are influenced by market sentiment and investor perceptions. A high or low P/E ratio may not accurately reflect a company's intrinsic value if driven by market hype or pessimism. 
  • Inflation, interest rates, and monetary policies can distort P/E ratios over time. Changes in these macroeconomic factors may impact the attractiveness of P/E-based valuations. 
  • P/E ratios can be volatile in the short term due to market fluctuations, investor sentiment, or company-specific news, leading to potential misinterpretations of valuation.  

A glance at alternatives to P/E Ratio 

  1. Price to Book Ratio compares a company’s market value to its book value and is useful for industries with substantial tangible assets, and a lower P/B ratio might indicate that the stock is undervalued.  
  2. Another alternative is the price-to-sales (P/S) ratio. It compares a company's stock price to its revenues. This ratio helps assess companies that might not be making a profit yet or operate in industries where earnings can change a lot. 
  3. The final alternative to consider is the enterprise value-to-EBITDA (EV/EBITDA) ratio. It helps determine how much a company is valued compared to the money it earns before deducting interest, taxes, depreciation, and amortization.

You may also want to know the PE Ratio of the Companies:

Sr.NoCheck PE Ratio for Companies 

1.

Adani Power Ltd PE Ratio

2.

Adani Green Energy Ltd PE Ratio

3. 

Tata Steel Ltd PE Ratio

4. 

Tata Consultancy Services Ltd PE Ratio

5. 

Bharat Wire Ropes Ltd PE Ratio

Related Articles